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Water Sanitation & Hygiene (WASH) Program

Water and Sanitation

According to UNICEF, almost fifty per cent of the developing world’s population – 2.5 billion people – lack improved sanitation facilities, and over 884 million people still use unsafe drinking water sources.

Inadequate access to safe water and sanitation services, coupled with poor hygiene practices, kills and sickens thousands of children every day, and leads to impoverishment and diminished opportunities for thousands more.

Poor sanitation, water and hygiene have many other serious repercussions.

Children – and particularly girls – are denied their right to education because  their schools lack private and decent sanitation facilities. Women are forced to spend large parts of their day fetching water.

Poor farmers and wage earners are less productive due to illness, health systems are overwhelmed and national economies suffer. Without WASH (water, sanitation and hygiene), sustainable development is impossible.

Our Aim and Objectives

Our aim is the reduction of water- and waste-related disease and the optimization of the health benefits of sustainable water and waste management.

We work  to improve water supplies and sanitation facilities in schools and communities, and to promote safe hygiene practices.

We sponsor a wide range of activities and work with many partners, including families, communities, governments, and like-minded organizations.

Objectives

  • To support the health sector in effectively addressing water- and waste-related disease burden and in engaging others in its reduction.
  • To assist non-health sectors in understanding and acting on the health impacts of their actions.

Our Work Plan

Water for people and health

Promotion of access to safe water supply and adequate sanitation as a major requirement to ensure a healthy life and enable the social development of the poor and unserved. Activities will focus on evidence-base policy development and are closely aligned with the millennium declaration goals

Capacity building for health-care waste management

  • Initiate health-care waste management pilot projects.
  • Develop best practices for the safe management of health-care wastes.
  • Develop health care waste management training centers.

To achieve the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) in water supply and sanitation, the number of people served must more than double, from 350 million in 2000 to 720 million in 2015. Even then, some 200 million would remain unserved. The expected annual cost of meeting the MDG target for water is between US$1.7 and 2.1 billion, and just as much is likely to be needed for sanitation. Most countries are undertaking WSS sector reforms, and some have achieved good progress in expanding access to services and improving operating performance.

Average per capita water availability in the region is about 5,300 cubic meters—moderate by world standards, but much of the region is arid with highly variable rainfall. The high level of rainfall variability is an important factor mitigating against growth and poverty reduction in Africa. Artificial storage is a necessity. For lack of well managed water-storage infrastructure, water-related services—irrigation, water supply, and hydropower—are much less prevalent than in other regions. For example, only 3.6 percent of the region’s total cropland is irrigated. SSA has an extraordinary density of international river basins; successful regional cooperation to develop and manage infrastructure and water flows in these basins promises large benefits.


All our WASH (water, sanitation and hygiene) programmes are designed to contribute to the Millennium Development Goal for water and sanitation: to halve, by 2015, the proportion of people without sustainable access to safe water and basic sanitation.

Program Long-Term Success:

Our aim is the reduction of water and waste-related disease and the optimization of the health benefits of sustainable water and waste management.

We work  to improve water supplies and sanitation facilities in schools and communities, and to promote safe hygiene practices.

We aim to support the health sector in effectively addressing water- and waste-related disease burden and in engaging others in its reduction. We also aim assist non-health sectors in understanding and acting on the health impacts of their actions.

All our WASH (water, sanitation and hygiene) programmes are designed to contribute to the Millennium Development Goal for water and sanitation: to halve, by 2015, the proportion of people without sustainable access to safe water and basic sanitation.


Program Short-Term Success:

Promotion of access to safe water supply and adequate sanitation as a major requirement to ensure a healthy life and enable the social development of the poor and unserved. Activities will focus on evidence-base policy development and are closely aligned with the millennium declaration goals.

  • Initiate health-care waste management pilot projects.
  • Develop best practices for the safe management of health-care wastes.
  • Develop health care waste management training centers.

Program Success Monitored by:

Amsha Africa Foundation will closely monitor the management of the WASH project through frequent visits to the site and have a permanent representative within the community group that the project is launched who will be reporting to AAF with periodic updates.

AAF will also be conducting surveys and interviews within the communities that benefit from the project to see its effectiveness and success. From these surveys, AAF will be able to make an educated evaluation of the project's success.

Program Success Examples:

In the Water and Sanitation projects that were completed in various communities around Kenya, below were some of the examples of success we found from our surveys a few months after the project completion date:

Education

  • Since the high level of school dropout was directly related to water shortage since kids had to trek for miles to fetch water, with water availability, parents were able to ensure that their children attend school. Dropout rates reduced significantly in some communities and school attendance rates shot up to almost 100%.

Health

  • Major Health centers in the region have adversely been affected by lack of water and poor sanitation. Many area residents suffered from diseases that were preventable if they had clean water and good sanitation. When AAF completed the WASH project in Kawangware and followed up a few weeks and months later, we found significant improvement in the health of the area residents due to clean water and environment. The district health officer also acknowledged how the local hospitals and health centers had been revived and were operating well due to availability of clean water and lack of overcrowding since many residents did not suffer from the diseases caused by poor water and unsanitary conditions that were prevalent before the project.

Our Current WASH Projects

Please click on the link to view some of the WASH projects we are currently working on.

Wash Articles

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